New Bern

Back in July of 2017, we had stopped in New Bern on our way to Beaufort. We hadn't spent much time in town as the weather was almost unbearably (pun intended!) hot and humid. What we had seen, though, appealed to us a great deal, and we always said that we would return some day to explore the first North Carolina state capital. The town was founded in 1710 by Swiss settlers who gave it the name of the town they had come from, Bern, today the capital of Switzerland. The founders also chose an exact replica of the flag of Bern for New Bern⸺with one exception. Take a look at this picture and see if you can spot the difference between the two flags. A detail, you say? Not to the bear, I'm sure!

We stayed at the Bridgepointe Hotel and Marina, just a short walk from the town center across the Alfred Cunningham Bridge, a drawbridge that spans the Neuse river. We knew that in 2018, Hurricane Florence had devastated New Bern, causing widespread floods and damages. We were relieved to see that in rebuilding, the town had gone to great lengths to preserve historic accuracy. We had a great time in New Bern, ate fabulous seafood at Morgan's Tavern & Grill (twice!) and had several coffees at the best coffee shop in town, the Nautical Star Coffee Company. The photos with captions that end in an asterisk (*) were taken by Vicki.


Walking across the Alfred Cunningham Bridge from our hotel to the center of town

Walking across the Alfred Cunningham Bridge from our hotel to the center of town


James Reed Lane Bear Plaza

James Reed Lane

Bear Plaza


Spanish moss is a common sight in New Bern New Bern's Christ Church

Spanish moss is a common sight in New Bern

New Bern's Christ Church


In the church garden * The steps to the church's upper floor * Along Pollock Street *

In the church garden *

The steps to the church's upper floor *

Along Pollock Street *


The past and the future The beginning of something big!

The past and the future

The beginning of something big!


Middle Street Baxter's stately public clock

Middle Street

Baxter's stately public clock


The New Bern riverfront

The New Bern riverfront


By the Riverfront Convention Center At the edge of the Grand Marina

By the Riverfront Convention Center

At the edge of the Grand Marina


In the Grand Marina The walkway skirting the Grand Marina

In the Grand Marina

The walkway skirting the Grand Marina


The Alfred Cunningham drawbridge we walked over to get to and from our hotel

The Alfred Cunningham drawbridge we walked over to get to and from our hotel


We only saw it open once * There are various types of bears... * ...all over New Bern. *

We only saw it open once *

There are various types of bears... *

...all over New Bern. *


Houses on Hancock Street

Houses on Hancock Street


This peaceful mural seems at odds with what goes on behind it... At the corner of South Front and Hancock Streets

This peaceful mural seems at odds with what goes on behind it...

At the corner of South Front and Hancock Streets


Some houses surprise by their color... ...some by their style, like this one on Pollock Street.

Some houses surprise by their color...

...some by their style, like this one on Pollock Street.


On Hancock Street On Pollock Street *

On Hancock Street

On Pollock Street *

Tryon Palace

Tryon Palace was the residence of the British governors of North Carolina. The building was completed in 1770. Shortly after the state capital was moved from New Bern to Raleigh, the building burned to the ground; it was not until the 1950s that a recreation faithful to the original was rebuilt and opened the the public. The building is named for William Tryon who resided in the palace until 1771 when he was appointed governor of New York and left the area. He was replaced by acting governor James Hasell until the newly appointed, and last governor of North Carolina, Josiah Martin showed up in New Bern on August 12, 1771.


Tryon Palace, headquarters of the British governors of North Carolina from 1770 to 1775

Tryon Palace, headquarters of the British governors of North Carolina from 1770 to 1775


On the palace grounds, tools and objects from the 1770s... ...are on display while staff members demonstrate associated activities...

On the palace grounds, tools and objects from the 1770s...

...are on display while staff members demonstrate associated activities...


...dressed in period outfits. The entrance to the stables Our tour guide inside the palace

...dressed in period outfits.

The entrance to the stables

Our tour guide inside the palace


The main room was used for meetings, dining, and dancing The next room was where buffet or dessert tables were set up

The main room was used for meetings, dining, and dancing

The next room was where buffet or dessert tables were set up


A room for relaxing, playing cards, or enjoying music The bewildering paraphernalia in a lady's dressing room of the 1770s

A room for relaxing, playing cards, or enjoying music

The bewildering paraphernalia in a lady's dressing room of the 1770s


Our tour guide for the lower level The butler's "cage" * The housekeeper's bedroom

Our tour guide for the lower level

The butler's "cage" *

The housekeeper's bedroom

The housekeeper and the butler were the only servants who had their own, private sleeping quarters


The butler's bedroom Our guide through the kitchen

The butler's bedroom

Our guide through the kitchen


The main room of the kitchen A secondary kitchen room

The main room of the kitchen

A secondary kitchen room


Above the kitchen... * ...several servants had to share a bed. * Back outside after the tour

Above the kitchen... *

...several servants had to share a bed. *

Back outside after the tour


Between gate and palace where the carriages used to drive up The entrance to the gardens

Between gate and palace where the carriages used to drive up

The entrance to the gardens


The sunset photographed through our not-so-clean hotel window

The sunset photographed through our not-so-clean hotel window

The photos on this page were taken on June 18 and 19, 2021.




<< Previous

Trips Home

Next >>

Home | Site Info | Family | The Area | Trips | France | Work | Rants | Photography | Odds & Ends




This page was last modified on May 1, 2022
Send feedback about this page to feedback@kiechle.com
https://www.kiechle.com/trips/newbern/index.htm

All contents © 1999-2022 The Kiechles